Jonah and the Great Big Fish is part of the Zonderkidz line of books. Intended for children ages four through eight, Rhonda Gowler Greene attempts to tell the story of Jonah in an age appropriate manner. As an adult who is reading and reviewing the book, I’ve tried to keep that in mind.

First, let’s look at the content of the book. Admittedly, when it comes to this aspect of the review, I can’t help but comment as an adult who is well-acquainted with the story of Jonah. The story begins with God instructing Jonah to go to Nineveh. He’s to tell the people of the city to repent. Jonah does not acquiesce and consequently flees. He climbs aboard a ship and sets sail. (For where, we’re not told.)  While sailing a wicked storm develops. Jonah is thrown overboard and is rescued by ‘a great big fish.’ After spending three days in the belly of the fish, Jonah wises up and agrees to go to Nineveh and proclaim the message that he has been given by God.

Overall, I was impressed by the author’s attention to detail and the fact that she did not add details––e.g. making the fish a whale. I also appreciated that she explains why Jonah was sent to the city.

That said, however, I was frustrated that the book ended with Jonah repenting and agreeing to proclaim the message that God had given him. While this is what he did, he did so reluctantly and then he became upset with God when God decides not to destroy Nineveh. In other words, by concluding the story where she did, the author suggests that Jonah is a hero, when, in fact, he’s far from it. What is more, kids are left with the impression that the people of Nineveh did not repent and that God destroyed the city. In short, the story has been sanitized and made far more palatable––the tension, struggle and temper-tantrums of the drama that is found in the biblical text have been smoothed over (or vanished altogether) to make for a cute story for children.

The second aspect of the book that I’d like to address is the artwork. No doubt, Margaret Spengler is a gifted and accomplished illustrator. However, I found the artwork rather unspectacular. While the colors are bright, the pictures appear fuzzy and out-of-focus.

All in all, the book started out strong. In fact, a couple of pages in, I was convinced that this was going to be one of the best (and most accurate) age appropriate book on Jonah that I’ve seen. And, it is. Yet, sadly, the story concludes far too early. So the big question is: Would I purchase the book? The answer, sadly, is that I would not. While it had a great deal of promise, the artwork and the abrupt ending ruined what could have otherwise been an excellent age-appropriate retelling of the story of Jonah.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Yesterday I watched Jeffrey Brown’s interview with Garrison Keillor. They talk Lake Wobegone, Keillor’s unlikely success and how Keillor prepares for and delivers the much acclaimed ‘News from Lake Wobegone’ segment of the show.

Amazon now has a 3D printing store. It’s more than just a place to purchase a 3D printer and supplies, although you can purchase a 3D printer if you so desire––the PrintrBot can be yours for as little as $349! It’s a place where you can go to customize a product for yourself or to give to someone as a gift, while at the same time purchasing 3D printed jewelry, home decor, toys and games, and tech accessories.

Admittedly, Amazon’s 3D shop is still in its infancy. As such, it’s likely a mere foretaste of what to come. For example, one could imagine a future iteration of the store that will allow you to create and upload your own design to be printed on-demand by Amazon––a design that one might be able to sell via Amazon as a 3rd party vendor.

Yet, it’s an exciting development. A development that holds a great deal of promise for the future. I look forward to playing around and experimenting with various aspects of the store. More than that, however, I look forward to how Jeff Bezos and team will utilize the 3D printing arm of the company in the days ahead.

That being said, as 3D printing becomes cheaper and more readily available: 1) How likely will you be to use the technology? And, 2) What is the first thing that you would likely pay-to-print and/or pay-to-customize?

Last night we had a corn boil at church. I took along the nabi Square HD to play around a bit. Sadly, I didn’t get to shoot a single video. I was, however, able to snap a few photos. Here they are:

This photo was taken while we were waiting for people to arrive. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was held in hand and snapped manually.

This photo was taken while we were waiting for people to arrive. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was held in hand and snapped manually.

This photo was taken in the kitchen. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was situated on the included mount and was on the counter. It was snapped utilizing the included remote.

This photo was taken in the kitchen. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was situated on the included mount and was on the counter. It was snapped utilizing the included remote.

This photo was taken while we were waiting for people to arrive. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was held in hand and snapped manually.

This photo was taken while we were waiting for people to arrive. It was shot using the 8MP resolution option. The camera was held in hand and snapped manually.